Partials by Dan Wells

Partials by Dan Wells


Partials by Dan Wells is a post apocalyptic novel where the a majority of humanity has been utterly wiped out by either war with the Partials (a genetically engineered race of humans who are not actually human) or a virus called RM that also left every baby born in the last eleven years dead. All survivors in North America have isolated themselves on Long Island in hopes they could protect themselves from the Partials, of whom they are still terrified of.

Amongst the "plague babies," one of the younger survivors immune from RM named Kira decides it's finally time to save humans from extinction when one of her best friends becomes pregnant--a requirement for all females over the age of 18. Taking on a new perspective, Kira decides the antidote won't be found by recording the deaths of babies that die from the virus, but from the perspective of those that released the virus--the Partials themselves.

Kira's adventure unveils secrets from the Partial's creation as well as connections between them that may not have been meant to be uncovered.

A mere nine days into the new year and I can assure you this is going to top my list of favorites for 2013. The pages of the book are packed thick with adventure and excitement. I intended to read a few chapters one day after work and ended up not going to bed until I was done! I have been gushing about this book for the last few days and even have interested my father in it. Once I was done I passed it on to him (he is finishing his current read before starting Partials).

The author has a fantastic talent for weaving a new world out of what we already know. The book is set in 2076, it is just far enough ahead of our time for new advancements to be made, but still soon enough that we recognize much of the world that has been lost between the war and the plague. Dan Wells is wonderfully descriptive without having detail-itis. His words paint pictures in your head of the time and places so well that you feel like you're sitting next to Kira herself, experiencing what she is.

When I first began reading Partials, I wondered if it was going to be long and drawn out. The words are not tiny on the page, but the book does use a smaller print than the average Young Adult novel I've read. At 480 pages, the book is longer than it looks it will be. As the story progressed, I was delighted to find the story was just as long as it needed to be. What started out with one storyline branched into several that flowed together throughout the book, and all were necessary for the storyline to progress. The comments I want to make about this book I don't want to in case you haven't read it, suffice to say if you like 1984 you will probably like this book.

This book in general made me excited. It is just, for lack of a better way to put it, GOOD. It's amazing, it's excellent, it is all encompassing as you immerse yourself in this familiar-yet-new world. I am not educated in the ways of critiquing someone's writing, but Dan Wells is excellent at his job! The descriptions, the storyline, the characters--everything works together really smoothly. There was no point that I was knocked out of the novel by something that didn't fit or wasn't written right. (Has that every happened to you? You've been sucked into a book, you're living it with the characters, and suddenly something doesn't set well, weather a sentence is written weird or a character does something that has nothing to do with the storyline and it never makes sense? That never happens here!)

I highly recommend you pick up this book. Also check out his short story for the Kindle Isolation (after you've read Partials!). The second book, Fragments, is due out on February 6th.

This review is also on Goodreads.


Partials by Dan Wells

2 comments:

  1. Your excitement for this books makes me think I'll eventually read it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope so! I think Dad's enjoying it--at least he doesn't seem bored when he tells me which part he's on.

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